Herding Group Dog Breeds

The breeds of the herding group could be called the “control freaks” of the dog world! They have the innate instinct to drive other animals in the direction that they desire them to move – regardless of the size of that animal! Even if they have never seen farmland, these breeds often try to herd children, their owners or even the cat! These energetic dogs thrive as household pets as long as they have an outlet for their stamina and intellect. They often excel in canine sports and obedience activities.

Australian Cattle Dog  

Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog came about as the answer to the need for a herding breed that could endure the heat and the harsh Australian terrain, along with long journeys over expansive grazing lands. Not only did this breed prove to be resilient, it is also capable of effectively driving cattle, without startling them by barking. The Australian cattle dog’s solid and compact build allows for the agility and quickness required to manage wild cattle.

 

Australian Shepherd  

Australian Shepherd

The Australian Shepherd was so named as it made its way to the US through Australia, though it is originally from a breed of European dogs that served as companion to Basque shepherds exporting Merino sheep. It is believed that this breed was crossbred with the Collie, thus beginning the development of the Australian shepherd. This breed is quick, agile, muscular, and thus capable of carrying out a full day’s work, even if it means keeping up with boisterous sheep. It has a weatherproof double coat, with a straight or wavy outer coat of moderate length.

 

Bearded Collie  

Bearded Collie

The Bearded Collie or Beardie is shaggy-coated all over, and even has hair under its chin, which explains the name. It has a short muzzle, a broad skull, and large teeth. It carries its long tail down low and wags it high when its excited. This breed developed from the Polish Lowland Sheepdog. Some lines of this breed are known for their coat that fades in the first year from birth then turns back to the color that’s almost as dark as the color they’re born with.

 

Beauceron  

Beauceron

The Beauceron is the largest sheepdog breed of France. It is also called the French Shorthaired Shepherd, Beauce Shepherd, Berger de Beauce, and Bas Rouge. Highly versatile, it can adapt to any tasks given them, making it an ideal pet and working dog. It has a coarse and dense outercoat and an undercoat that is also dense. Its coat is a bicolor black and tan. Eyes: horizontal, set well apart, large, slightly oval, dark brown. Its straight ears are set high and its nose, black and slightly convex towards the end. The dewclaw on its hind legs gives it a distinctive characteristic.

 

Belgian Laekenois  

Belgian Laekenois

The rarest of the four Belgian Shepherd dogs, the Belgian Laekenois is a sturdy, well-proportioned medium-sized dog with a rough wire coat that easily distinguishes it. This breed was actually used as army dogs in the World Wars. The ears of the Belgian Laekenois are small, triangular, and set high on the head. The eyes are brown, average in size and slightly almond-shaped while the muzzle is of equal length to the topskull and somewhat pointed. The nose is black and the tail is very long.

 

Belgian Malinois  

Belgian Malinois

The Belgian Malinois was once considered a part of the Belgian Sheepdog breed, until it was recognized as a separate type in America in 1959. It was named after Malines, Belgium, where it was developed. The most obvious difference between the four Belgian sheepdog breeds is their coat type and standard colors. The Belgian Malinois’s height is often evenly proportioned to its length, and it is known to carry itself quite proudly, with its high head, muscular built, and flowing gait. It has little dim eyes, upright ears, a narrow muzzle, and an even or scissors bite.

 

Belgian Sheepdog  

Belgian Sheepdog

The breed commonly known as the Belgian Sheepdog was also given the name Groenendael to differentiate it from the other three Belgian sheepdog varieties, namely the Malinois, the Tervuren, and the Laekenois. The Groenendael looks much like the others, with its proud appearance, muscular built, even proportions, slightly pointy muzzle, tight lips, an even or scissors type bite, triangle-shaped ears, and a fluffy tail. It is named after the Belgian village where it was developed, and remains the most popular of the four Belgian sheepdog varieties. Some also refer to it as the Belgian Shepherd.

 

Belgian Tervuren  

Belgian Tervuren

The Belgian Tervuren was named after a village in Belgium where it was originally developed. It was one of four types that were once collectively known as the Belgian sheepdog breed. The other three are the Groenendael (the one that is now widely referred to as the Belgian sheepdog), the Malinois, and the Laekenois. The Belgian Tervuren is evenly proportioned, with a moderately brawny built and smooth gait. It has small dim eyes, a somewhat pointy muzzle, an even or scissors bite, and upright triangular ears.

 

Bergamasco  

Bergamasco

The Bergamasco is a solid, square-bodied, medium-sized dog with a thick distinctive coat that is one of its trademarks, designed to protect it from all kinds of weather and attacks from other animals. Its coat has three different types of hair that forms flocks, easily marking the breed. The coat also drapes over its eyes, which is protected from the sun's rays. In spite of its heavy coat appearance, the Bergamasco is a highly energetic and agile dog.

 

Border Collie  

Border Collie

The Border Collie is known as the world's premiere sheep herding dog. Its agility, athletic appearance and stamina stand in equal measure with its grace and substance. Its hard, muscular body is well-balanced conveying the impression of effortless movement and endless endurance. The Border Collie is extremely intelligent. Its keen, alert expression, eagerness and intensity are key characteristics of its breed.

 

Bouvier des Flandres  

Bouvier des Flandres

The Bouvier des Flandres is a herding dog- powerfully built, rugged and formidable in appearance. Its harsh double coat protects him in all types of weather; while his keen sense of smell and watchful gaze make him a most suitable farm dog. The Bouvier is agile, spirited and bold with a calm and steady manner. He thrives on plenty of room to work and exercise, but is not an "outdoor dog"; he must live with his loving people -- his "flock," his "pack".

 

Briard  

Briard

The Briard or Chien Berger de Brie is a dog of handsome form. It is an old breed, used for guarding and herding stock in France. This was an "all arounder", a farm dog that had multiple tasks to accomplish. The Briard was a partner to the shepherd, relying on intelligence and its independent nature to get those tasks done. He was a family dog as well, going home at night to watch over the family and their household. A big-hearted and a gentle loving dog, the Briard makes a wonderful family pet and an excellent watchdog. His herding instincts are strong and he is happiest leading a busy, active life.

Advertisements


Dog Resources

Raising Your Dog

Dogs By Size

Dogs By Group

petside media network

Breeds: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z