Papillon  

Papillon

Often called the "Butterfly Dog" because of its fringed ears that resemble a butterfly's outspread wings, the Papillon ("Pappy-Yon") is one of the oldest purebred Toys. It appears in paintings in Italy as far back as the 15th century. In France the court ladies and royal children were frequently painted with a Toy Spaniel pet, as the breed was then known. These Toy Spaniels had drooping ears, but otherwise the prettiest of them were unmistakably the same breed we have today. It is often said that the Papillon is a big dog in a little dog's body. They can do virtually all that a larger dog can do, but with less effort, upkeep, and space requirements. Truly, their unique beauty goes far beyond their glorious ears!

 

Parson Russell Terrier  

Parson Russell Terrier

The Parson Russell Terrier, formerly known as the Jack Russell Terrier, has a flexible, slender build and long legs that make it an ideal hunting companion. Its coat can be either broken or smooth, though always coarse and adaptable to varying weather conditions. It has v-shaped ears that bend forward, dark eyes shaped like almonds, a black nose, and a tail that’s set high on its back.

 

Pekingese  

Pekingese

The Pekingese, sometimes affectionately called the Peke, has a long, sturdy body covered by a long, thick and straight overcoat and a thick undercoat. Though the breed has a somewhat flat face due to its short muzzle, the mane formed by its coat around the shoulders is its main similarity to a lion, and has earned it the old nickname of “lion dog.” (This is not to be confused with lion hounds – dog breeds that were primarily used to hunt down lions.)

 

Pembroke Welsh Corgi  

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a breed that has been developed for cattle driving for centuries. It was trained to nip at the heels of cattle to steer them to grazing areas. Its low body allows it to run under cattle while avoiding getting hit by their hooves. It has a long body, big upright ears, a fox-like face, a wide level skull, a soft coat that’s water-resistant, and a short, at times non-existent, tail.

 

perro de presa canario  

Perro de Presa Canario

The Perro de Presa Canario or the Presas are a very rare breed. Sometimes, they are even confused with Molosser Breeds. The Presa or the Canary Dog has a powerful, square head. It is also worth noting that its head is nearly as wide as it is long. Its muzzle is broad while the chest is very deep and likewise broad. The rump is slightly raised. Perro de Presa Canarios have dense bones, thick skin, powerful muscles and a massive head with a large jaw. Instead of the usual hanging types as with most dogs, their ears are cropped. As for its body, white markings are sometimes seen. They also have long, straight legs, even or slightly undershot mouth and great power with agility.

 

Peruvian Inca Orchid  

Peruvian Inca Orchid

Also known as the Peruvian Hairless Dog, this breed is indeed a rare sight. Almost bald at first sight, it also goes by the name Moonflower dog, Perro Flora, and Perro Sin Pelo del Peru. The Peruvian Inca Orchid has very sensitive dark and round eyes that often squint when exposed to direct sunlight. Their thick and leathery ears sometimes have wisps of hair and their lips are wrinkled. However, their skin is very pliable and super soft. There Peruvian Inca orchid has two types – the coated and the hairless. However, the only difference immediately visible is the ear set. The hairless dogs have prick ears, while the coated dogs usually have a rose ear. It is also interesting to note that their ear (for the coated and hairless Peruvian Inca Orchids) would be considered a fault if belonging to any other dog breed.

 

pbgv  

Petit Bassett Griffon Vendeen

The Petit Bassett Griffon Vendeen (or PBGV) gets part of its name from France’s Vendeen region, where it was developed to trail small animals over a tough landscape. Its name, which translates to “small low wire-haired dog”, aptly describes this breed. Its length measures about 50% more than its measured height on average, which gives it a well-proportioned build. Its low build and short legs enable it to easily go through cover in pursuit of game.

 

Pharaoh Hound  

Pharaoh Hound

The Pharaoh Hound, now the national dog of Malta, was so named for its resemblance to ancient Egyptian depictions of dogs and Anubis, the jackal god of Egyptian mythology. It is noted for its ability to blush: its ears and nose become flushed when it’s excited. This tendency is apparent through its short and glossy coat. The Pharaoh hound boasts of a build that’s comparable to a greyhound’s. With its sleek, powerful and nimble body, it is able to run down rocky terrain and chase fast-moving game. This breed’s overall look is one of grace and nobility.

 

Plott  

Plott

The Plott Hound, or Plott, is an athletic dog with superior treeing and hunting characteristics. It has a muscled and streamlined body that can hound even coyotes, wildcats, and wolves. Its list of prey illustrates that this hunter is equipped with the appropriate stamina, courageous spirit and superior intelligence. This enduring creature has a smooth and glossy double coat, which is thick enough for weather and sun protection. Its long tail is held high when it gets excited. It also makes sharp and high-pitched sounds, which is surprisingly uncharacteristic of coonhounds.

 

English Pointer  

Pointer

The Pointer, also known as the English Pointer, is a keen hunter and loyal companion. The breed is noted for its endurance despite warm conditions. Its sleek yet strong build contributes to its abilities as a hunting dog. It exhibits an effortless gait that enables it to travel over wide distances when hunting. When closing in on target, the field Pointer tends to carry its tail in an upright position.

 

Polish Lowland Sheepdog  

Polish Lowland Sheepdog

The Polish Lowland Sheepdog, also known as the Polski Owczarek Nizinny or PON, has worked alongside Polish shepherds and farmers since the 16th century. It has served as herding dog for centuries. Quite adept in a busy farm setting, this breed is known for its stamina and muscular build, as well as its long, wiry double coat that gives it protection and an adorably unkempt look. It has a dark nose, hazel or brown eyes, a docked tail, an even bite, and a smooth gait. Polish breeders revived the Nizinny after World War II, which almost wiped out this hardworking breed.

 

Pomeranian  

Pomeranian

The Pomeranian, named after the province of Pomerania, Germany where its larger ancestors came from, is popular for its tiny and fluffy appearance. It was made popular in the Western world by Queen Victoria, who took then 30-pound Pomeranians to dog shows in the late 19th century and started a kennel that eventually developed smaller dogs. These days, the average Pomeranian seen in shows is about 4 to 5 pounds. The Pomeranian’s feathery coat and arched tail makes it quite an attractive show dog. The thick collar and a natural upward gaze also contribute to its overall elegant look.

 

poodle  

Poodle

The Poodle is a foremost embodiment of the pampered, even spoiled, pet. There are three recognized varieties of the Poodle, the differences of which remain in size and some functions. Both the miniature and toy varieties were sized down from the standard Poodle, and also gained popularity among dog-lovers soon after the breed became well liked among nobility. The elegant Poodle has squared proportions, which it holds quite pompously with an effortless gait. Its tail is usually docked short or about half its actual length.

 

Portuguese Podengo  

Portuguese Podengo

There is no single description of the Portuguese Podengo because it actually falls into three categories, according to size: Grande (large), Medio (medium), and Pequeno (small). However, the most common is the Medio Podengo Portugueso which is a sighthound, moderately sized with flat skull and well-proportioned head. The nose can be black at times but the most common color is brown. The tail of the Portuguese Podengo is indicative of its mood. When it is calm, the tail is slightly drooped. When in motion or excited, the tail is horizontal. Their ears are naturally upright, triangular, large, and highly mobile, turning forward to catch sound. The Portuguese podengo also has a prominent chest which is muscular. Their feet are similar to that of a cat and have well arched toes with strong and hard pads. There is only a slight arch to the back line. Their necks are also strong and muscular minus the dewlap.

 

Portuguese Water Dog  

Portuguese Water Dog

The Portuguese Water Dog, also know as the Cao de Agua, and at times affectionately called the Portie, is known for its exceptional swimming ability, which is attributed to its webbed feet. It is a tough, dynamic, brawny dog that is of slightly greater length than its height. It shows flexibility and stamina by working in or out of water for extended periods. It has a thick, protective, wavy coat that easily sheds off water. It has ears that are heart-shaped and hang down the sides of the head, dark eyes, and a level or scissors bite. Its strong legs are parallel and straight, while its tail is thick from the base and narrow at the tip.

 

Pug  

Pug

The Pug is a sturdy, compact, squarely proportioned breed endowed with a soft, smooth coat, furry ears, and a dark muzzle. It has a somewhat undershot bite, a tightly curled tail, a unique rolling pace, and dark, emotive eyes. Traders of Holland found it in (and brought it back from) China before the 16th century. The breed’s popularity ensued, following the victory of William I, Prince of Orange, himself a Pug owner. Later, it also became a popular royal breed in the Victorian era of England.

 

Puli  

Puli

The Puli is noted for its distinctive, corded coat that grows to touch the ground as it reaches adulthood. Medium boned, boxy, and muscular, this breed is an old variety of the Hungarian sheepdog. It has a quick gait, contributing to its agility. Its coat is double and weatherproof, made up of a wavy outer coat and a thick, wooly undercoat, that form cords that are flattened or round. It has dark brown, almond-shaped eyes, medium-sized ears, and a tight-curling tail.

 

Pumi  

Pumi

The most noticeable feature in a Pumi’s face is its elongated muzzle. This breed’s dark, slightly oblique eyes are encased in close-fitting lids. You can tell from the Pumi’s tail its character – always carried high and happy. Their ears are always upright and tipped forward. Set back from its body are compact hind feet. However, they have somewhat flat ribs. Their chest is deep and they have strong feet, with hard nails and elastic pads. The Hungarian Pumi’s average-length, curling coat is not felty and do not form into cords unlike that of the Puli’s.

 

Pyrenean Shepherd  

Pyrenean Shepherd

A Pyrenean Shepherd’s face is very expressive. They have dark, intelligent eyes – with the exception of the harlequin or slate gray colours. Their head is of small proportions in comparison to other dogs. They also have a rather flat skull and a short, pointed muzzle. They have long, lean bodies that reflect their natural athleticism. Typical of a sure-footed mountain breed, they have well proportioned legs with lean, well-bent hocks. The Pyrenean Shepherd’s coat has two varieties – smooth faced (smooth haired) or rough faced (long haired). The rough faced variety has some long hairs around the muzzle and face., though never to the point of having a bearded effect or obscuring the eyes. The smooth faced variety on the other hand, has a modest ruff around the face and neck, with fine, short hairs on the muzzle.

 

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